Bio:

Hubbard, Edward F. (History - 1852)

Contact:

Janet Schwarze

Email:

stan@wiclarkcountyhistory.org

Surnames:

HUBBARD BURLINGHAM STILES MEYERS WERLE SCHULTZ DOLOF

 

----Source: 1918 History of Clark County, Wisconsin

EDWARD F. HUBBARD, a well to do agriculturist of Pine Valley Township, was born in Tioga County, Penn., Nov. 8, 1852. His parents were Kellogg and Lucina (Burlingham) Hubbard, the former a native of Pennsylvania and son of Lucius Hubbard. They were married in that state, where they followed farming until 1863, when they came to Wisconsin. The party consisted of the father and mother, five children-Edward F., Richard, Charles, Alice and Mary and an uncle of Kellogg's, named Horace Stiles. Their first stopping place in this state was Sparta, and from there the father, the uncle and the three boys (Edward being then only 10 years old, set out to walk to Neillsville. The stage, driven by Hank Meyers, a well-known stage character of that day, brought the rest of the family on the day following. The men and boys stopped nine miles from Black River Falls, walking to the Falls before breakfast the next morning. Then
Anson Green, an old logger, was met with, and with his team and wagon they completed the journey to Neillsville. This Anson Green owned considerable land and hotel property and Mr. Hubbard decided to try the hotel then came to the United States, locating in Milwaukee, Wis., which was then a hamlet containing but a few houses. There he worked at his trade for about a year, and then went to Washington County, where he opened a shoe shop.

 

A year later he married Julia Schilling, whose father, John, a farmer in Manitowoc County, had come from Prussia, Germany, with his wife and five children, the daughter, Julia, being then 18 years old. William Werle remained in Washington County two years after his marriage, and two children were born to him there-Christina and Philip H. The family then moved to Kiel, Manitowoc County, where William conducted a shoe shop for about a year, subsequently, buying forty acres of wild land there. He also purchased some cows and a team of oxen, built a log house and barn and later added forty more acres to his farm. During the fourteen years that he stayed on that place he cleared in all sixty acres of land, and he and his wife had eight more children-Minnie, Henry, Barbara, Louise, William, Anna, John and Helen. He then sold his farm and moved with his family to Milwaukee, where he found employment in a shoe factory, and where he died nineteen years later. Philip H. Werle remained at home until he was 20 years old. He was educated in the schools of Manitowoc County, and when old enough began working out. April 20, 1875, he married Augusta Schultz, who was born Sept. 29, 1858, daughter of August and Hannah Schultz, both natives of Prussia, a farmer of Manitowoc County, and he and his wife resided in Milwaukee for three years, subsequently, he working at the carpenter's trade. In 1879 he came to Clark County and bought eighty acres of wild land in Section 25, Loyal Township, on which there was a small log hut, which became the family residence. In order to support his family he had to work out in the woods and mills and at the carpenter's trade, in the meanwhile clearing his farm as he found time and opportunity. He had two cows to begin with, and after two years he secured a team of oxen.

 

Later, he built a frame house, the occupation of which marked a big step in advance on his road to prosperity. Supplies were obtained from Spencer, eleven miles away, and Mr. Werle for some years had to carry them home on his back, there being no other means of transportation available. For some time they were able to trade but little, having nothing but butter and eggs. Though he made sure progress, it was very gradual, and he had to continue working out for twenty years before he was able to settle on his farm. Since those early days he has. cleared forty acres and built a nine-room house and a barn 36 by 74 feet. He keeps graded Holstein cattle and Berkshire hogs, his buildings and farm equipment are in good condition, and for him the old days of privation and industrial slavery are things of the past.

 

Mr. Werle has served four years as pathmaster of his district. He and his wife leave had children as follows: Adolph, who left home when 23 years old and has not since been heard of Lena, now Mrs. George Dolof, and a resident of Milwaukee, having four children-Gilbert, Vander, Lloyd and Ethel Robert, who is in Idaho Clara, residing in Loyal John, who now is at a training camp of the war Emma, residing in Loyal Edward, now a resident of North Dakota, and Ella, who lives at home. The family are members of the Evangelical Church.

 

 


© Every submission is protected by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

 

Show your appreciation of this freely provided information by not copying it to any other site without our permission.

 

Become a Clark County History Buff

 

Report Broken Links

A site created and maintained by the Clark County History Buffs
and supported by your generous
donations.

 

Webmasters: Leon Konieczny, Tanya Paschke,

Janet & Stan Schwarze, James W. Sternitzky,

Crystal Wendt & Al Wessel.

 

CLARK CO. WI HISTORY HOME PAGE